Advertiser, politico, and arts enthusiast. Product of Far West Texas.
Install Theme
Piracy is the new radio. That’s how music gets around.

To sum up my friends’ comments:

  • If you enjoyed the first 15 mins of UP…
  • Disney gets back around to being Disney

Agreed.

 

Del Norte Drive-In, El Paso, Texas

Del Norte Drive-In, El Paso, Texas

The XX vs. 2Pac

He certainly blessed Van Horn.

He certainly blessed Van Horn.

From sun in Colombia to snow in Minneapolis.

From sun in Colombia to snow in Minneapolis.

¡Toro! (at Plaza de toros cañaveralejo)

¡Toro! (at Plaza de toros cañaveralejo)

Eydie Gormé

—Adios

Adiós - Eydie Gormé

Douglas Rushkoff’s new book: Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now.

Back in the 1970s, futurism was all the rage. But looking forward is becoming a thing of the past. According to Douglas Rushkoff, “presentism” is the new ethos of a society that’s always on, in real time, updating live. Guided by neither history nor long term goals, we navigate a sea of media that blend the past and future into a mash-up of instantaneous experience.
Rushkoff shows how this trend is both disorienting and exhilarating.

Without linear narrative we get both the humiliations of reality TV and the associative brilliance of The Simpsons. With no time for long term investing, we invent dangerously compressed derivatives yet also revive sustainable local businesses. In politics, presentism drives both the Tea Party and the Occupy movement.

In many ways, this was the goal of digital technology—outsourcing our memory was supposed to free us up to focus on the present. But we are in danger of squandering this cognitive surplus on trivia. Rushkoff shows how we can instead ground ourselves in the reality of the present tense.

Looking forward to it. Here’s a podcast about what it will entail. 

Douglas Rushkoff’s new book: Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now.

Back in the 1970s, futurism was all the rage. But looking forward is becoming a thing of the past. According to Douglas Rushkoff, “presentism” is the new ethos of a society that’s always on, in real time, updating live. Guided by neither history nor long term goals, we navigate a sea of media that blend the past and future into a mash-up of instantaneous experience.
Rushkoff shows how this trend is both disorienting and exhilarating.
Without linear narrative we get both the humiliations of reality TV and the associative brilliance of The Simpsons. With no time for long term investing, we invent dangerously compressed derivatives yet also revive sustainable local businesses. In politics, presentism drives both the Tea Party and the Occupy movement.
In many ways, this was the goal of digital technology—outsourcing our memory was supposed to free us up to focus on the present. But we are in danger of squandering this cognitive surplus on trivia. Rushkoff shows how we can instead ground ourselves in the reality of the present tense.
Looking forward to it. Here’s a podcast about what it will entail. 
Lady Bird Johnson and Secretary of the Interior Udall at Big Bend National Park. 1966.

Lady Bird Johnson and Secretary of the Interior Udall at Big Bend National Park. 1966.

So while I was jumping up and down, I just spur-of-the-moment grabbed and decided to play “Twist And Shout.” The room went bananas and the sound guys were looking at me, telling me that the producers were giving me a thumbs-up. I was honestly just standing there so happy, thinking about how crazy everything was around me. And then it dawned at me that we were in Chicago and Ferris Bueller took place in Chicago — that song “Twist And Shout” played such a big part in that movie.

— DJ Mel (on DJing at President Obama’s Election Party)

(Source: stereogum.com)

Bailar bien, bailar mal - Gepe (featuring Carla Morrison)